129 Posts

Using the .NET Core Middleware for request processing is, imho, not very well documented. There are a couple of things that are not obvious: retrieving query parameters and binding a request body to an object. To top things off, accessing the request Body has a few issues. Here’s how to deal with these scenarios.

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Over the past year and a few months, we, my coworkers and I that is, have been using an Actor Model framework to implement a sort-of state-engine-based distributing computing engine. Using a generalized framework for this seemed to introduce many complexities that, in my mind, could potentially be simplified. My weekend project is centered around exploring what can be done out-of-the-box with .NET Core.

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EntityFramework 7 is the defacto ORM used with .NET Core to provide cross-platform compatible data access. EF7 is missing many features that are present in EF6, though. My initial apprehension was that this would create a scenario where one could not use .NET Core if their projects relied on EF6 features. Fortunately, it’s pretty easy to get EF6 working with .NET Core. The sacrifice is a loss of cross-platform hosting ability.

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ASP.NET’s built in CSRF (Cross-site request forgery) is pretty straight forward. You add a token to your views via an HTML Helper, and then decorate your controller actions with a specific attribute to validate the token on POST. There are many times, seemingly randomly, where users have invalid tokens on their requests. MVC throws a 500 error with an HttpAntiForgeryException. For legitimate users, this is not an optimal experience.

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In continuing to build upon my previous project to get Angular2 working with Visual Studio 2015, I’ve been playing with routing and components.

While routing and components are very different when compared to Angular v1, it’s still pretty straight forward to get a basic application up and running.

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In the solution that I’m migrating to ASP.NET Core, I have a domain project that uses System.Web’s HttpContext. Since System.Web is not part of .NET Core, I had to figure out how one gets the current user’s identity within a domain class.

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With OWIN and .NET 4.6.x, it was pretty straight forward to enable SSL (TLS), and redirect all requests to the HTTPS end-point with Visual Studio’s tooling (IIS Express). It’s not quite as straight forward to accomplish this in .NET Core.

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After using OWIN for months for basic OAuth authentication, it’s apparent that Microsoft is abandoning OWIN . This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. .NET Core is built on a similar structure as that which was implemented in OWIN. Essentially, we have a familiar middleware pipeline.

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Some of Microsoft’s built-in code generation/tooling is really janky. One such example is the code generator that will produce service references and proxy classes from a SOAP WSDL definition. I’ve never liked this particular feature of Visual Studio. The service classes themselves don’t play nicely with injection, behave strangely with instantiation, scoping, singleton patterns, and are generally so .NET 1.1…

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