155 Posts

angular_small

Yesterday I started working on a conversion of my Angular 1.x multiselect dropdown to Angular 2.x In a short amount of time, I think I’ve made pretty good progress. It’s not complete, but I was happy to be able to quickly get something comparable to my Angular 1.x directive.

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As of late, I’ve really been getting more and more into Angular2. For me, the important aspects are learning how to do what I’ve done with v1.x in the newer framework. This involves a great deal of understanding of the difference between v1.x and v2.x. Since one of my most popular Angular 1.x directives is the Multiselect Dropdown w/ Checkboxes, I decided to tackle converting it in incremental steps. From the top, the first piece of significant functionality is filtering the list of items.

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In my previous post, I put together a little demo showing how to detect if capslock is depressed and how to warn the user. To make this a bit more useful and reusable, I rolled it into an Angular 1.x directive.

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Recently, I was reading an article about modifying data on a response in Angular. With my previous posts dealing with TimeZones and such, it made me curious if I could also transform my data on each POST in Angular.

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If you’ve read my various posts on dealing with datetimes and timezones lately, I discovered a handy little mechanism for dealing with timezones in Microsoft SQL.

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The Angular2 team has done a good job with their newish Bootstrap Angular2 components. I’ve been playing with them for a while.

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In an application that I’m currently working on, that deals with Sales data, there are instances when I need to apply date comparisons relative to a user’s local time. This is an interesting problem with which to deal.

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Dates are pretty easy to manage with pure JavaScript. The other day though, I discovered a bug in a bit of date manipulating code.

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A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about deploying multiple applications to Azure virtual directories from a single Git repository to Azure. That method works well. However, it by default only supports building and deploying a single .NET project. This was fine in my previously example in which only one of the deployment projects I had was .NET based. Using a custom KUDU script, it’s possible to deploy multiple .NET applications to the virtual directories from a single git repository.

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