243 Posts

Within a new project I’ve been working on, I needed to be able to handle Routes dynamically in Angular. Primarily, this was driven on authorization. Due to this aspect, authenticaiton had to occur first and that’s where the fun begain.

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Recently I starting playing around with Reactive Forms in Angular 9. One thing that immediately bugged me is that the controls within a form group are not strongly typed/referenced.

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Continuing my series on porting to .NET Core, I have mostly converted a production .NET 4.5.x application to .NET Core 2.2.  As I mentioned, there are lots of conversion points that are worth mentioning for anyone else endeavoring to modernize a .NET application.

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Continuing my (old) series on porting to .NET Core, I am sharing some of my experiences of moving a production, legacy .NET 4.5.x application to .NET Core 2.2.  This was a interesting endeavor since the application itself had some really deep hooks into the older WebAPI/MVC pipeline.

Ripping out those hooks is like opening the proverbial can of worms ..

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Over the past few weeks, I’ve been working on making a legacy web application more accessible.  Key factors in accessibility are being keyboard and narrator friendly.  These factors are governed by various “A11yMAS” guidelines.  For this post, I’ll focus on a particular AngularJS datatimepicker (calendar) directive, which is used in the legacy web application, that lacked keyboard accessibility completely. 

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A few weeks ago, I picked up a treadmill. It’s kind of nice having a treadmill during the winter months so that one does not have to run in the dark while the days are short.

I immediately discovered that the typical apps that I use on WearOS are painfully inadequate for recording indoor activities, though.

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Earlier today, I was struggling a bit to get a .NET Core application’s authentication mechanism to behave appropriately for both MVC (view) and API (ajax/json) requests. In .NET Core 2.x, handling this is not as straight-forward as it could be, but it’s doable. Effectively, we want a user requesting a view through a normal browser request to get an authentication challenge / login page, but we want API requests to receive a 401 response and end it there. Under normal circumstances, though, both types of requests would receive the login page.

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