Tag Archives: webdevelopment

Home / webdevelopment
59 Posts

angular_small

It’s been a while, but I had some time today to work a bit more on my Angular2 multiselect implementation. The next aspect that I wanted to implement is validation.

More Link

Recently I posted about a method I use in JavaScript (Angular specifically) to transform posted Date objects to transmit the local DateTime. It’s a simple method that uses JavaScript’s “toLocaleString” method while intercepting POST requests. Everything worked fine except when IE11 was introduced into the equation.

More Link

As of late, I’ve really been getting more and more into Angular2. For me, the important aspects are learning how to do what I’ve done with v1.x in the newer framework. This involves a great deal of understanding of the difference between v1.x and v2.x. Since one of my most popular Angular 1.x directives is the Multiselect Dropdown w/ Checkboxes, I decided to tackle converting it in incremental steps. From the top, the first piece of significant functionality is filtering the list of items.

More Link

In my previous post, I put together a little demo showing how to detect if capslock is depressed and how to warn the user. To make this a bit more useful and reusable, I rolled it into an Angular 1.x directive.

More Link

Angular provides some handy mechanisms for dealing with browser history. With these mechanisms it’s straight-forward to handle URL changes through direct user interaction or the browser back/forward buttons.

Typically, when entering an Angular app, you’ll have an abstract route defined and then use the $urlRouterProvider to define a default route. Well, when I say “you,” I should qualify that to say that this is how I typically define states with ui-router.

More Link

Using the .NET Core Middleware for request processing is, imho, not very well documented. There are a couple of things that are not obvious: retrieving query parameters and binding a request body to an object. To top things off, accessing the request Body has a few issues. Here’s how to deal with these scenarios.

More Link

ASP.NET’s built in CSRF (Cross-site request forgery) is pretty straight forward. You add a token to your views via an HTML Helper, and then decorate your controller actions with a specific attribute to validate the token on POST. There are many times, seemingly randomly, where users have invalid tokens on their requests. MVC throws a 500 error with an HttpAntiForgeryException. For legitimate users, this is not an optimal experience.

More Link